Photo Competitions

August 15, 2017  •  3 Comments

Not quite sure how I think about photo competitions in general.  After all, someone, whose work you might not know, or even respect, is going to assign a numerical score to what you consider aesthetically pleasing.  Take for example one of the judges in the latest round of photo competitions at the Ex who could not get over images mounted on neutral white foam core forming a border around the picture – the judge did not like it.  Seems like a pretty odd thing to get worked up about especially considering the rules which left very little leeway when it comes to presentation – but I digress.

What I really wanted to talk about is how I think the Saskatchewan Art Showcase could be so much better for everyone if the groups more accurately represented the quality of the work submitted.  This year my wife, Ileana, entered into the first time amateur group and came away with a third prize.  She also entered into other groups and had a few honorable mentions, so that was all well and good.  What concerned me was her comment that had she known she would be competing against people who regularly produce work beyond what many professional photographers are capable of she would not have entered the competition.  It seems skewed and feels almost as crazy as putting Usain Bolt in with a bunch of 5th graders for the 100m dash – hardly a fair match.

 

The driver for this inequity is, of course, the term amateur which we somehow equate with a level of knowledge and quality below what we think of when we imagine a professional photographer.  Not surprising,  according to Merriam-Webster the two definitions for amateur are:

Amateur, one who engages in a pursuit, study, science, or sport as a pastime rather than as a profession.  She played soccer as an amateur before turning professional

OR

One lacking in experience and competence in art or science. The people running that company are a bunch of amateurs.

 

In the first case, we associate level of skill and knowledge with the ability to make money from the endeavor.  I.e the implication is that one is good enough to make money from it.  And, in the second case clearly, there is an implied lack of skill.

The problem is that photography is fundamentally different.  I agree, there is skill involved and it takes years of constant attention and honing and many other factors to consistently produce high-quality work.  However, and I am going to get some flack for saying this, being a professional photographer is not a real strong indicator of the quality of the art produced.  Yes, a professional photographer will, or at least should, have impeccable technical skills, and there will be little to fault in his/her work when it comes to the technical stuff.  But, ultimately we are talking about creating art, and a solid memorable photograph is made up of much more than attention to the mechanical aspects.  A good shot, like any good art, ideally should leave you speechless and hopefully question your very existence.  In fact, if you check out the 100 most powerful shots of all times many of them are candid captures shot by amateurs and professionals alike.

My point is that we need to think of a different way to categorize people submitting work for competitions in general and the Saskatchewan Art Showcase specifically.  By making the groups more equal regarding the quality of work we make the process less intimidating for people with lower skills as they will compete on a more equal footing.  At the same time by putting high-quality work into a separate category, we would also make it better for stronger photographers as those people would face stiffer competition from their  Before the Race peers and should ideally, therefore, produce more powerful work.  Personally, I would much rather place lower in a harder competition than score first in a category where I did not have to do my best – the Usain Bolt principle.

 

 

So what might this look like?  How would we go about grouping people into something fairer?  For starters, I think a simple question scoring sheet would be an easy way to determine what category one would fall into.  Maybe something like this - give your self 1 point for every Yes answer

  1. Have you ever entered any work into a competition before? 
  2. Do you occasionally make money from your photography by selling your work and/or services? 
  3. Do you take classes, read books or watch how-to videos on photography related subjects?
  4. Have you won any prizes in a competition during the last two years?
  5. Have you ever showed your work in a solo show?
  6. Do you regularly print your own work?
  7. Do you go out and regularly photograph?  (at least once or twice a week)
  8. Have you ever paid for photography workshops?
  9. Do you regularly attend camera club meetings and events
  10. Do you regularly spend a money on camera, tools, and photo related software?

If you scored between 1 and 3 you belong in category 1

If you scored between 4 and 6 you belong in category 2

If you score more than 6 you belong in category 3

Obviously, this may take a bit more thought to make sure it all comes together but implementing a scheme like this would ensure two things.  First, you fall into a category that more closely matches what you do with photography.  Second, if you are good, you will also automatically advance into the next category as your score starts to go up from winning competitions and hopefully also sell some of your work.

I think it is time we drop the amateur/professional label – we have outgrown its relevancy

 

 


Comments

Roberta Wells(non-registered)
When you consider " if you check out the 100 most powerful shots of all times many of them are candid captures shot by amateurs and professionals alike" it becomes very difficult to put the pictures into categories based on who took the picture.One of the most powerful shots in National Geographic history was taken by a doctor. The images need to stand alone when being judged. The Showcase of the Arts has worked for years trying to categorize the competition with the sole purpose of encouraging as many entries as possible. For many new photographers just seeing their pictures beautifully displayed and comparing them with others is enough. The categories will always be a challenge but care must be taken not to discourage potential entrants by making it more difficult to enter their pictures.
Bruce A. Johnson(non-registered)
Very well written Jannik. I've (as we all have ) had an image fail in a competition because of a judges beliefs / views / religion. I think your on the right track. I also love that with the pointing to the problem, you've offer a solution as well. Well done my friend.
Annie Berube(non-registered)
I agree with you that a simple questionaire would help categorize who enters the competition. Could you send this proposal to the organizers?
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